The Incoherent Podcast

tech, culture, and ideas with a dash of comedy.

Author: Mark (page 2 of 5)

The Incoherent Podcast: Episode 21Part 2 – WWDC 2015 Apple Music

If you made it to the end of our last podcast (which is a feat of strength unto itself) you were probably wondering what happened to our Apple Music discussion, and whether you would ever get to hear what the incoherent nerds thought about it.

Wonder no longer, part two is here.

We decided to cut the episode into two parts because we felt that it was just too damn long. With that, here is part two, our deep-dive into Apple Music. Listen and enjoy.

Editor’s Note: This discussion happened long before the Taylor Swift Vs Apple music drama so we don’t go over that at all, although it’s fascinating to think how it would have altered our already delirious discussion.

AppleMusic2

Mark Mruss is a computer programmer by nature and by profession. He’s written Android apps, win32 apps (we called them applications back then), apps in python, and even a website or two. He is currently fascinated by all things mobile. He likes computers, beer, and his family (not in that order).

Episode 18 – Microsoft Build 2015 is PG

Episode 18 – Microsoft Build 2015 is PG

This week we cover Microsoft Build 2015. From Azure, to Office, to Windows 10, to HoloLens and back again. Android and iOS apps on Windows? Listen to find out what Mark and Ben think in episode 18 of the Incoherent Podcast.

The Enterprise – Asure and Office

MacWinLinux2

We begin our discussion of Microsoft Build 2015 by going over some of the more interesting enterprise announcements from Build. Focusing first on Microsoft’s cloud solution Azure:

We look at the strength of Microsoft in the enterprise and their recent openness to support additional platforms.

Windows 10

Windows_Product_Family_scaled

We leave the enterprise realm and head to the more consumer focused world of Windows 10. We go in depth on Microsoft’s attempt to bring developers and apps to Windows:

Microsoft announced four “universal platform bridges” each named after bridges in the real world. Each bridge will allow developers a new way to bring their apps into Windows 10.

Project Westminster – Web Apps

Makes “it easy for you to create a Windows app that packages your website for publishing to the Store. Once installed, your website can update and call Windows APIs from JavaScript, creating a more engaging user experience.

Publishing your website into the store will be as easy as providing your URL and clicking ‘publish’. ”Project Westminster” will also enable you to light-up additional device capabilities in your packaged website.”

Project Centennial – Win32 Apps

Makes “it possible to package and publish your current .NET and Win32-based Windows applications to the Windows Store, providing a new way of distributing and monetizing your application on Windows PCs.

In addition to packaging your application for Store distribution, ”Project Centennial” will also enable you to take advantage of Universal Windows Platform capabilities and APIs.”

Project Astoria – Android Apps
Allows “you to build apps using Android code to target Windows 10 phones without having to leave your Android IDE.

In addition to extending the IDE, ”Project Astoria” will include a Windows phone emulator and interop capabilities that help your app (including UI and services) to run and look great on the Windows platform.”

Project Islandwood – iOS Apps
Allows “you to build a universal Windows app from within Visual Studio 2015 using your existing Objective-C® code.

You will be able to import your Xcode® project into Visual Studio, tailor the app experience to run on each Windows device family, and extend your iOS code to take advantage of Universal Windows Platform capabilities.”

All quotes from Microsoft’s Universal Windows Platform Bridges site.

Hololens

microsoft-hololens-logo

We then move onto Microsoft’s augmented reality solution Hololens. We discuss possible usages and some complaints that were leveled at the latest development model.

Conclusion

We wrap up the podcast with a discussion of Microsoft’s strength in the enterprise and it’s growing weakness / relevance in the consumer space.

We also talk about snakes a little bit.

Mark Mruss is a computer programmer by nature and by profession. He’s written Android apps, win32 apps (we called them applications back then), apps in python, and even a website or two. He is currently fascinated by all things mobile. He likes computers, beer, and his family (not in that order).

Episode 013 – Stop…Pebble Time

In lucky episode 13, Mark and Ben take a look at the newly Kickstarted Pebble Time smartwatch. We look at its new features, the record breaking kickstarter numbers, and why Ben decided not to get one.

Shame Tweet?

Yes, we are currently running a twitter shame-tweet campaign to see if we can get Ben to give in and purchase an Apple Watch. You don’t even have to write anything, just click this handy dandy shame tweet link.

Now down to podcast business.

What is the Pebble Time?

Pebble Time Smart Watch

It’s version three of the Pebble smartwatch series developed by the Pebble Technology, Corp out in California. They’ve sold over One million units so far, which is pretty cool, check them out.

So why cover the it on this Podcast?

Well the Pebble Time just finished a record breaking Kickstarter campaign, and Ben has a Pebble so we thought it would be a good time to talk about it. Also we felt that we had to cover something other than the Apple Watch for once. (Even though we managed to squeeze it in a few times)

Why did Pebble go back to Kickstarter again for the Pebble Time?

For that answer let’s look at their Kickstarter page:

Pebble was brought to life by 68,929 backers who supported our vision three years ago. Even though we’ve grown tremendously since then, we’re still a small company battling some of the largest competitors in the world. We believe that this is the best and most efficient way for us to get our latest product to the people who want it most: people like you.

How did it do in it’s Kickstarter campaign?

The Pebble Time kickstarter was very successful. The campaign broke several Kickstarter records, including raising one million dollars in the shortest amount of time and the most money raised overall. TechCrunch has a nice article that broke the Kickstarter numbers down so let’s take a look at them:

In the one month Kickstarter Pebble raised $20,338,986 USD which translats into a total of 95,906 pebbles sold. That total number can be broken down into: 58,966 Pebble Time sold and 36,940 Pebble Time Steel sold. The Steel is just a more upscale fancy looking version of the watch.

Over all this was a 11.6% increase in the number of Pebble’s sold between the two Kickstarter campaigns, and an increase of 65.8% in the amount or revenue raised. The large increase in the total amount raised and the modest increase in the number of units sold shows a much higher average revenue per user (ARPU) on the second Kickstarter. This increase in ARPU makes sense given the higher price of the Pebble watches in the second Kickstarter and the addition of the also higher priced Pebble Time Steel variant. The original pebble was Kickstarted for either $115 or $120 whereas the Pebble Time Kickstarted for $159 to $179 and the Pebble Time Steel was Kickstarted at $250.00.

What’s new in the Pebble Time?

The big new features in the Pebble Time are:

  • A Colour screen with 30 FPS animation capabilities.
  • A built-in microphone to respond to emails and texts.
  • The new Pebble Timeline OS.
  • Smart bands that let you easily add sensors and other components to your Pebble.

Pebble Time Smart Watch

So why didn’t Ben buy it?

Well for the complete answer you’ll have to listen to the podcast, but in a nutshell he felt that the new features were not worth the upgrade, especially given that the Pebble Timeline will eventually be released for all models.

How does the Apple Watch fit into this? (Mark)

I’m glad you asked, again listen to the podcast for all of the details, but really we look at the Pebble as being something quite different than the Apple Watch and not a direct competitor. In the end we decide that the expected large sales of the Apple Watch will help Pebble sell more smartwatches. A rising tide and all…

Anything else?

Yes, did you shame tweet Ben yet? If not here’s another link:

Oh and don’t forget to leave a comment or a review of The Incoherent Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcast, every review helps.

Later.

Mark Mruss is a computer programmer by nature and by profession. He’s written Android apps, win32 apps (we called them applications back then), apps in python, and even a website or two. He is currently fascinated by all things mobile. He likes computers, beer, and his family (not in that order).
Older posts Newer posts